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Category: business travel

A Rapid Entrepreneurial Trip to London and Birmingham England – An Interesting Tale

A quick back story….
I was asked by my friend Jon Le Toq to speak at his fitness business event (Fitness Entrepreneur Bootcamp) in Birmingham, England. The event was held at Aston Business College, within Aston University.

I would only be gone for 4 days. That’s a fast turn around for an 11 hour flight. 

I flew from LAX direct to London Heathrow on Virgin Atlantic. I like the airline because of the level of service, newer planes, and great entertainment system at each seat. And, I must be honest…. I just like everything that Richard Branson does, and that’s part of the reason I fly Virgin. I didn’t sleep much on this overnight flight, so jet lag took over quickly. 

When I arrived in London, I took a train to Paddington Station in central London. I was reminded by Kelli to “Mind the Gap” which is a nice way to say if you do not look down and pay attention when you get on the train, you will likely break your leg on the tracks below. NOTE: I did not by my buy my train tickets in advance and had no issues getting my ticket at the exact time I wanted.

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How to be an Audacious Adventure Seeker, Business Success and World Traveler

What story are you telling yourself about how or why you cannot do something? Are you saying things such as, “well… that’s them and not me!” Are you creating stories about why you cannot travel, develop a business, or make a difference in people’s lives? It’s important to make one clear distinction…. Your story is likely not the truth. The story you tell yourself in your head, and the actual truth of the matter, are likely two different things. There is a big difference in telling yourself “I can’t” and actually not being able to do something. Learn how to go beyond “stuck” to “thriving”.

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Technology Considerations for US Travelers to Europe

Europe and the US are not that different, despite, of course, the obvious social, political and linguistic comparisons.  Europeans’ love affair with technology rivals our own here in the USA, and so technologically speaking; you won’t be in for any major surprises. However, there are some important considerations worth knowing, whether you’re a traveling entrepreneur, a digital nomad or a summer backpacker.

Power Sockets and Plugs
In the US, we are all used to our 2-pronged electricity socket, serving out 120 volts of glorious electricity. However, in Europe, that serving increases from between 220 to 240 volts, and so, as you can imagine, an adaptor is wholly necessary. Even for trivial items, such as a phone charger, iPod docking station or a hair dryer, an adaptor should always be used as they are not simply a means of being able to fit the prongs into the odd shaped holes. Should you plug in a device without an appropriate adaptor to regulate the electricity flow, the result will most likely be the complete short-circuiting of the supply to the room/building, and even in some cases rendering the device you plugged in completely inoperable – something you definitely don’t want to happen to your MacBook Pro, right?

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10 Things Traveling Entrepreneurs Need to Know About Visiting Europe

International travel always requires a certain amount of deliberation: where you are going, how to get there, what to see etc. However, when traveling as a digital nomad, with a business to uphold whilst abroad, it can be especially confusing to know where to start. With that in mind, based on personal experience, here is your top 10 most important need-to-knows about traveling to Europe.

1. English is Commonly Spoken, but it pays to try the Local Language
With a complicated melting pot of dozens of different languages, Europeans naturally require some sort of lingua franca. Thankfully, English has taken hold in Europe as the language of diplomacy, and so most people (especially in Western Europe) will speak both their native language and English. However, it is considered rude in most countries to not at least try and communicate in the native tongue, so it is certainly worth trying to learn choice phrases, or trying to achieve a comfortable level of another European language; Europe will reward you for the effort.

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10 Lessons Learned from Being a Digital Nomad

Lessons are plenty when following a nomadic lifestyle. Every day can present new horizons; stripping away the realities of yesterday and presenting you with a lovely new set of rules from which to learn from. Unlike in a standard nine to five job, intertwining your job with your lifestyle opens up whole new possibilities for personal growth, and here’s 10 things we have learned from our time as digital nomads.

1. The world isn’t as big as you think
Wherever we have lived, friends, family and the comforts of home have only ever been a click away. Through the speed in which international travel can be conducted, these days, to the variety of social apps and websites on the market today, no matter where you are you’re connected with those who matter.

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How to pack light and efficient for traveling entrepreneurs

Guest post by Nick Hilden

The first time I ever went to Europe, I was a college student going to Paris for several months of study. I had not traveled all that much, and I ended up packing foolishly. When I decided take a break from my studies to visit Barcelona, the recollection of dragging my overstuffed suitcase through the streets caused me to reassess my situation. I threw out full sized bottles of shampoo, gave away most of my books (especially the 3,000 page volume of Proust), left behind my heavy coat (It was the middle of June. Why had I brought a down jacket?), and cut my towel in half. This was a rather extreme, on-the-fly learning situation, but over the years and many more travels, I have come to be something of a expert at packing.

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