Girl’s Trip and College Tour in Hawaii While Getting Business Deals Done

Call it what you want, my recent trip to Hawaii was all the above. I am traveling with my Mother, Aunt and my daughter on a 5 day trip to Honolulu for a combo girls trip that really began in April. During an All-Inclusive trip (Dad and Dear Husband John) family trip over the Easter break my daughter declared “I am going to the University of Hawaii, I never want to leave here!” True to her word, as soon as applications could be sent, she applied to UH. Since Waikiki is my mother’s favorite place on Earth and my Aunt has never been, we all hopped a plane to O’ahu to tour the campus, relax on the beach and sip umbrella drinks.

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How to be an Audacious Adventure Seeker, Business Success and World Traveler

What story are you telling yourself about how or why you cannot do something? Are you saying things such as, “well… that’s them and not me!” Are you creating stories about why you cannot travel, develop a business, or make a difference in people’s lives? It’s important to make one clear distinction…. Your story is likely not the truth. The story you tell yourself in your head, and the actual truth of the matter, are likely two different things. There is a big difference in telling yourself “I can’t” and actually not being able to do something. Learn how to go beyond “stuck” to “thriving”.

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Office space on the road – more than a necessary evil!

Guest Post by Biorn Tjallen

Are you tired of not having a proper office? Most freelancers dream of a workplace of their own, where they can leave their stuff over night and don’t have to negotiate the maddening crowd each time they try to get down to business. So did I. But here is a story for you.

My most recent academic job came with the benefit of luxurious office space. The post was in Norway and everything looked like a dream. A quaint botanical garden lay right under my gaze from the window. And when l lifted my head to look further, I saw forested hillsides turn into snow capped mountains. As for the room itself, it was huge. So was my desk. I could sit and pontificate on one end, while my visitors would feel small and insignificant on the other. The general sentiment – as revealed by the embittered collegial gossip – was that I had somehow skipped the unofficial queue for office promotion. I was a lucky bastard!

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Make professional virtue your habit!

Guest Post by Biorn Tjallen

Make professional virtue your habit!
Perhaps it was the subtle swells of the Ionian Sea – gently rocking the ferry back from Greece – that inspired me to read about Aristotle’s disagreement with Socrates. My heartfelt accord with his point, however, was simply the result of painful personal experience. I had been unforgivably lazy, lying there in the Peleponesian sun. It had cost me a great assignment, damaged an important professional contact and broken the back of my already reeling finances. I could have screamed to the waves that Aristotle was right: The fact that you know what you ought to does not mean that you will actually do it!

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Teaching and Training in Thailand

Guest Post by Cameron Conaway

My fiancée Maggie and I were at a Thai restaurant in Charlottesville, Virginia. We didn’t know it at the time, but we were two burnt out teachers and we were only in our mid-twenties. She was finishing her second year working at a boarding school for kids with learning disabilities – a job that was often twenty-four hours a day for five or six days a week – and I’d been teaching for several years all over the place – from Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to high schools in Tucson, Arizona and, most recently, for several online universities. The tipping point occurred as we dove into our spring rolls and pad Thai.

Maggie’s eyes filled with tears. Her face was angelic; these were not tears of stress.

“Are you okay, babe?” I asked.

“Yeah. I just…I know what’s next for me. I know what I need.”

She looked around and I followed her eyes into the Buddha and temple relics. Her eyes came back to mine:

“I need to move abroad and teach. Are you joining me?”

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Technology Considerations for US Travelers to Europe

Europe and the US are not that different, despite, of course, the obvious social, political and linguistic comparisons.  Europeans’ love affair with technology rivals our own here in the USA, and so technologically speaking; you won’t be in for any major surprises. However, there are some important considerations worth knowing, whether you’re a traveling entrepreneur, a digital nomad or a summer backpacker.

Power Sockets and Plugs
In the US, we are all used to our 2-pronged electricity socket, serving out 120 volts of glorious electricity. However, in Europe, that serving increases from between 220 to 240 volts, and so, as you can imagine, an adaptor is wholly necessary. Even for trivial items, such as a phone charger, iPod docking station or a hair dryer, an adaptor should always be used as they are not simply a means of being able to fit the prongs into the odd shaped holes. Should you plug in a device without an appropriate adaptor to regulate the electricity flow, the result will most likely be the complete short-circuiting of the supply to the room/building, and even in some cases rendering the device you plugged in completely inoperable – something you definitely don’t want to happen to your MacBook Pro, right?

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10 Lessons Learned from Being a Digital Nomad

Lessons are plenty when following a nomadic lifestyle. Every day can present new horizons; stripping away the realities of yesterday and presenting you with a lovely new set of rules from which to learn from. Unlike in a standard nine to five job, intertwining your job with your lifestyle opens up whole new possibilities for personal growth, and here’s 10 things we have learned from our time as digital nomads.

1. The world isn’t as big as you think
Wherever we have lived, friends, family and the comforts of home have only ever been a click away. Through the speed in which international travel can be conducted, these days, to the variety of social apps and websites on the market today, no matter where you are you’re connected with those who matter.

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Lessons learned from being a digital nomad

Guest Post By Nick Hilden

Over the course of the past six years, I have lived in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Paris, Barcelona, Granada, and a great many small towns in between. I’ve roamed up and down the United States, have driven all over Spain, and have buzzed to a number of tropical locations. I have slept in houses, apartments, hotels, hostels, on couches, under bridges, in parks, and more than once have spent periods of months on end living in a tent in the middle of nowhere. I have become almost too accustomed to sitting in airports, bus stations, and on train platforms, and have been in two near plane crashes.

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How to make money as a freelance writer while you travel

Guest post by Nick Hilden

When I initially made the leap into full-time freelance writing three years ago, I was living under the wet-blanket sky of Portland, Oregon, providing web descriptions of washing machines, updating resumes, and occasionally producing smutty short stories at a rate of half-a-cent per word. Today I am sitting in the sun on my balcony overlooking Granada, Spain’s Gran Via, and after I finish this article I will be writing a piece about Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, followed by a guide to driving along the southern coast, then a story about a man I met in Paris whose lips and ears had been cut off while he was working as a prison guard in Turkey. Later—beer and tapas.

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