Girl’s Trip and College Tour in Hawaii While Getting Business Deals Done

Call it what you want, my recent trip to Hawaii was all the above. I am traveling with my Mother, Aunt and my daughter on a 5 day trip to Honolulu for a combo girls trip that really began in April. During an All-Inclusive trip (Dad and Dear Husband John) family trip over the Easter break my daughter declared “I am going to the University of Hawaii, I never want to leave here!” True to her word, as soon as applications could be sent, she applied to UH. Since Waikiki is my mother’s favorite place on Earth and my Aunt has never been, we all hopped a plane to O’ahu to tour the campus, relax on the beach and sip umbrella drinks.

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How You Can Get Paid To Drink Coffee and Travel The World – Yep It’s True

make money while you travel

THIS IS ANOTHER GREAT TOOL TO HELP YOU EARN MONEY WHILE YOU SEE THE WORLD!!!!

When is the last time your local coffee house paid you to drink their coffee and share it with your best friends?

The answer is obviously “NEVER!”

But, what if things where different?

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A Rapid Entrepreneurial Trip to London and Birmingham England – An Interesting Tale

A quick back story….
I was asked by my friend Jon Le Toq to speak at his fitness business event (Fitness Entrepreneur Bootcamp) in Birmingham, England. The event was held at Aston Business College, within Aston University.

I would only be gone for 4 days. That’s a fast turn around for an 11 hour flight. 

I flew from LAX direct to London Heathrow on Virgin Atlantic. I like the airline because of the level of service, newer planes, and great entertainment system at each seat. And, I must be honest…. I just like everything that Richard Branson does, and that’s part of the reason I fly Virgin. I didn’t sleep much on this overnight flight, so jet lag took over quickly. 

When I arrived in London, I took a train to Paddington Station in central London. I was reminded by Kelli to “Mind the Gap” which is a nice way to say if you do not look down and pay attention when you get on the train, you will likely break your leg on the tracks below. NOTE: I did not by my buy my train tickets in advance and had no issues getting my ticket at the exact time I wanted.

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Waikiki in the Spring | 10% Work and 90% Play | Digital Nomad Travel in Hawaii

JSE’s View:

Waikiki is often known for its views of the Diamond Head Crater (technically a caldera, see below) and a continuous flow of gently rolling waves which are perfect for sun burned tourists; with a possibility of riding a big wave, surfing for the first time.

For us, it was a time for a week-long getaway, a bit of traveltrepping, and an exploration of historical sites. On this trip something incredible happened, I (JSE) did not even inquire about wifi. An anomaly indeed. Perhaps it was the colorful cocktails with a slice of pineapple. Maybe it was the obvious decompression I felt when my feet his the sugary sand. Not sure. Don’t care. It was just great.

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Office space on the road – more than a necessary evil!

Guest Post by Biorn Tjallen

Are you tired of not having a proper office? Most freelancers dream of a workplace of their own, where they can leave their stuff over night and don’t have to negotiate the maddening crowd each time they try to get down to business. So did I. But here is a story for you.

My most recent academic job came with the benefit of luxurious office space. The post was in Norway and everything looked like a dream. A quaint botanical garden lay right under my gaze from the window. And when l lifted my head to look further, I saw forested hillsides turn into snow capped mountains. As for the room itself, it was huge. So was my desk. I could sit and pontificate on one end, while my visitors would feel small and insignificant on the other. The general sentiment – as revealed by the embittered collegial gossip – was that I had somehow skipped the unofficial queue for office promotion. I was a lucky bastard!

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Make professional virtue your habit!

Guest Post by Biorn Tjallen

Make professional virtue your habit!
Perhaps it was the subtle swells of the Ionian Sea – gently rocking the ferry back from Greece – that inspired me to read about Aristotle’s disagreement with Socrates. My heartfelt accord with his point, however, was simply the result of painful personal experience. I had been unforgivably lazy, lying there in the Peleponesian sun. It had cost me a great assignment, damaged an important professional contact and broken the back of my already reeling finances. I could have screamed to the waves that Aristotle was right: The fact that you know what you ought to does not mean that you will actually do it!

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Teaching and Training in Thailand

Guest Post by Cameron Conaway

My fiancée Maggie and I were at a Thai restaurant in Charlottesville, Virginia. We didn’t know it at the time, but we were two burnt out teachers and we were only in our mid-twenties. She was finishing her second year working at a boarding school for kids with learning disabilities – a job that was often twenty-four hours a day for five or six days a week – and I’d been teaching for several years all over the place – from Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to high schools in Tucson, Arizona and, most recently, for several online universities. The tipping point occurred as we dove into our spring rolls and pad Thai.

Maggie’s eyes filled with tears. Her face was angelic; these were not tears of stress.

“Are you okay, babe?” I asked.

“Yeah. I just…I know what’s next for me. I know what I need.”

She looked around and I followed her eyes into the Buddha and temple relics. Her eyes came back to mine:

“I need to move abroad and teach. Are you joining me?”

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Technology Considerations for US Travelers to Europe

Europe and the US are not that different, despite, of course, the obvious social, political and linguistic comparisons.  Europeans’ love affair with technology rivals our own here in the USA, and so technologically speaking; you won’t be in for any major surprises. However, there are some important considerations worth knowing, whether you’re a traveling entrepreneur, a digital nomad or a summer backpacker.

Power Sockets and Plugs
In the US, we are all used to our 2-pronged electricity socket, serving out 120 volts of glorious electricity. However, in Europe, that serving increases from between 220 to 240 volts, and so, as you can imagine, an adaptor is wholly necessary. Even for trivial items, such as a phone charger, iPod docking station or a hair dryer, an adaptor should always be used as they are not simply a means of being able to fit the prongs into the odd shaped holes. Should you plug in a device without an appropriate adaptor to regulate the electricity flow, the result will most likely be the complete short-circuiting of the supply to the room/building, and even in some cases rendering the device you plugged in completely inoperable – something you definitely don’t want to happen to your MacBook Pro, right?

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10 Things Traveling Entrepreneurs Need to Know About Visiting Europe

International travel always requires a certain amount of deliberation: where you are going, how to get there, what to see etc. However, when traveling as a digital nomad, with a business to uphold whilst abroad, it can be especially confusing to know where to start. With that in mind, based on personal experience, here is your top 10 most important need-to-knows about traveling to Europe.

1. English is Commonly Spoken, but it pays to try the Local Language
With a complicated melting pot of dozens of different languages, Europeans naturally require some sort of lingua franca. Thankfully, English has taken hold in Europe as the language of diplomacy, and so most people (especially in Western Europe) will speak both their native language and English. However, it is considered rude in most countries to not at least try and communicate in the native tongue, so it is certainly worth trying to learn choice phrases, or trying to achieve a comfortable level of another European language; Europe will reward you for the effort.

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How to make money as a freelance writer while you travel

Guest post by Nick Hilden

When I initially made the leap into full-time freelance writing three years ago, I was living under the wet-blanket sky of Portland, Oregon, providing web descriptions of washing machines, updating resumes, and occasionally producing smutty short stories at a rate of half-a-cent per word. Today I am sitting in the sun on my balcony overlooking Granada, Spain’s Gran Via, and after I finish this article I will be writing a piece about Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, followed by a guide to driving along the southern coast, then a story about a man I met in Paris whose lips and ears had been cut off while he was working as a prison guard in Turkey. Later—beer and tapas.

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